What I’ve been reading

I’ve been hitting the books hard so far in 2015! I don’t know what it is, I will go months barely reading and then when I find a book I really enjoy the next thing I know I’ve plowed through a bunch more! I was thinking about this and decided I’ve been enjoying some of these books so much I might as well share them with everyone, maybe something will also peak your interest.

I’m kind of lazy so I’m just going to post the little synopsis the internet provides because I’m not really into book reviews…..

The first read of 2015 was “Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me (and other concerns)” by Mindy Kaling. Now I barely know anything about Mindy Kaling except that she played Kelly on the office and was mostly ridiculous but also hilarious. This book literally made me laugh out loud throughout the two days it took me to read it.

“Mindy Kaling has lived many lives: the obedient child of immigrant professionals, a timid chubster afraid of her own bike, a Ben Affleck–impersonating Off-Broadway performer and playwright, and, finally, a comedy writer and actress prone to starting fights with her friends and coworkers with the sentence “Can I just say one last thing about this, and then I swear I’ll shut up about it?” Perhaps you want to know what Mindy thinks makes a great best friend (someone who will fill your prescription in the middle of the night), or what makes a great guy (one who is aware of all elderly people in any room at any time and acts accordingly), or what is the perfect amount of fame (so famous you can never get convicted of murder in a court of law), or how to maintain a trim figure (you will not find that information in these pages). If so, you’ve come to the right book, mostly! In Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?, Mindy invites readers on a tour of her life and her unscientific observations on romance, friendship, and Hollywood, with several conveniently placed stopping points for you to run errands and make phone calls. Mindy Kaling really is just a Girl Next Door—not so much literally anywhere in the continental United States, but definitely if you live in India or Sri Lanka.”

Next up was “Yes Please” by Amy Poehler mostly because Mindy talked about Amy so much in her book I was like gosh I should read Amy’s book. So I did. And it was also quite hilarious but also just full of awesome stuff.

“Do you want to get to know the woman we first came to love on Comedy Central’s Upright Citizens Brigade? Do you want to spend some time with the lady who made you howl with laughter on Saturday Night Live, and in movies like Baby Mama, Blades of Glory, and They Came Together? Do you find yourself daydreaming about hanging out with the actor behind the brilliant Leslie Knope on Parks and Recreation? Did you wish you were in the audience at the last two Golden Globes ceremonies, so you could bask in the hilarity of Amy’s one-liners?If your answer to these questions is “Yes Please!” then you are in luck. In her first book, one of our most beloved funny folk delivers a smart, pointed, and ultimately inspirational read. Full of the comedic skill that makes us all love Amy, Yes Please is a rich and varied collection of stories, lists, poetry (Plastic Surgery Haiku, to be specific), photographs, mantras and advice. With chapters like “Treat Your Career Like a Bad Boyfriend,” “Plain Girl Versus the Demon” and “The Robots Will Kill Us All” Yes Please will make you think as much as it will make you laugh. Honest, personal, real, and righteous, Yes Please is full of words to live by.”

Next: “Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Midwife in Mali” by Kris Holloway. This book really got to me, even though it was written about a country in west Africa, around 20 years ago, it was still so relevant to the struggles I see daily here in Tanzania.

“Monique and the Mango Rains is the compelling story of a rare friendship between a young Peace Corps volunteer and a midwife who became a legend. Monique Dembele saved lives and dispensed hope in a place where childbirth is a life-and-death matter. This book tells of her unquenchable passion to better the lives of women and children in the face of poverty, unhappy marriages, and endless backbreaking work. Monique’s buoyant humor and willingness to defy tradition were uniquely hers. In the course of this deeply personal narrative, as readers immerse themselves in the rhythms of West African village life, they come to know Monique as friend, mother, and inspired woman.”

Next: “However Long The Night: Molly Melching’s Journery to Help Millions of African Women and Girls Triumph by Aimee Molloy
Though a bit hard to stomach at times as it deals very strongly with FGM/FGC (Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting) this book inspired me in so many ways.

In 1974, American exchange student Molly Melching arrived in Senegal for a six-month program that would become a forty-year journey of transformation. Inspired by her experiences living in a remote village, she founded Tostan, an organization dedicated to empowering communities by using democracy and human-rights-based education to promote relationships built upon dignity, equality, and respect.

Tostan’s groundbreaking strategies have led to better education for the women of rural Africa, improved health care, a decrease in child/forced marriage, and declarations by thousands of African communities to abandon the practice of female genital cutting. However Long the Night is the story of how Melching, named by Newsweek and the Daily Beast as one of the “150 women who shake the world,” is paving the way to a world with human dignity for all.”

And lastly (so far), I have just finished ” Keeping Hope Alive: One Woman, 90,000 Lives Changed” by Hawa Abdi. This book also inspired me hugely, I mean even the title blows you away. Dr. Hawa Abdi has done remarkable, incredible things in Somalia.

“The moving memoir of one brave woman who, along with her daughters, has kept 90,000 of her fellow citizens safe, healthy, and educated for over 20 years in Somalia.

Dr. Hawa Abdi, “the Mother Teresa of Somalia” and Nobel Peace Prize nominee, is the founder of a massive camp for internally displaced people located a few miles from war-torn Mogadishu, Somalia. Since 1991, when the Somali government collapsed, famine struck, and aid groups fled, she has dedicated herself to providing help for people whose lives have been shattered by violence and poverty. She turned her 1300 acres of farmland into a camp that has numbered up to 90,000 displaced people, ignoring the clan lines that have often served to divide the country. She inspired her daughters, Deqo and Amina, to become doctors. Together, they have saved tens of thousands of lives in her hospital, while providing an education to hundreds of displaced children.

In 2010, Dr. Abdi was kidnapped by radical insurgents, who also destroyed much of her hospital, simply because she was a woman. She, along with media pressure, convinced the rebels to let her go, and she demanded and received a written apology.

Dr. Abdi’s story of incomprehensible bravery and perseverance will inspire readers everywhere”

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5 thoughts on “What I’ve been reading

  1. Brittany Bergman

    I love knowing what other people are reading — so many great books for me to add to my TBR list! I loved Mindy Kaling’s book and now I really want to read Amy Poehler’s. I’ll probably listen to the audio version. I love listening to funnier/lighter books, especially when they’re read by their authors!

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